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MODELLING SCALES for 45 mm track

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The G1MRA DIAGRAMS
CHOSING a STANDARD
COMPATIBILITY

GAUGE ONE SCALES ARE INDEPENDENT OF TRACK & WHEEL STANDARDS
Any Gauge One scale can be combined with any one set of track and wheel standards.

It is up to you to chose first the size of model which prefer or have got used to, and then to make your choice of track and wheel standards.

The three principal scales all look pretty convincing at a normal viewing distance as long as they are not mixed in the same train.

When I started in Gauge One there was not much stock available at 1:32 so I used 10 mm/ft for British and 29:1 for North American models. I have since changed over to 1:32 for great accuracy for both as more models have become available in that scale.

10 mm/ft   (approx. 1:30.5)
Slightly oversize relative to the track.

Slightly oversize relative to the 52 mm G1MRA Standard or Fine width over the wheels. This results in the outer faces of the wheels being 1.8 mm too close together, or 0.9 mm outside the wheels each side which could handy for modelling outside cylinders.

1:32   (3/8" to 1 foot or approx 9.5 mm/ft)
This is very close to scale relative to 45 mm track.

1:29   (approx. 10.5 mm/ft)
Oversize relative to the track by the same amount again that 10 mm/ft is against 1:32.

Some models look more oversize than others. Boxcars do appear to have an exessive overhang at the sides giving them a 'narrow gauge look', Diesel locomotives with the truck sideframes outside the wheels are less noticeable. For several years this was the only lowish cost option for a wide range of North American models.

To see these models at their best they should be rewheeled for track with a gauge of 49.5 mm.

1:24   (1/2" to the foot).
Used for 3′6″ narrow gauge on 45 mm track, as on South African Railways.

1:20.32   (15 mm to the foot).
Used for 3′0″ narrow gauge on 45 mm track, as on many early North American mountain railways.


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28 Mar 2013